Avons-nous vraiment encore besoin d’une voiture particulière ? À quoi ressemblera notre paysage urbain dans 20 ans ? Quels sont les besoins des régions rurales ? Qui sont les têtes pensantes qui réfléchissent à la mobilité et comment ? Et qu’est-ce que les services à la demande et les analyses de mobilité ont à voir avec tout ça ? Des questions que nous nous posons tous au quotidien dans notre travail et pour lesquelles nous devrions – au moins de temps en temps – noter nos réponses et nos réflexions. Pour vous, pour nous, pour des élans passionnants, pour plus de mobilité et moins de trafic. 

Why transport planning must be agile

Why transport planning must be agile

Mobility is a highly complex construct, consisting a wide variety of puzzle pieces and dependent on diverse influencing variables. Since the beginning of professional planning of publicly oriented mobility services, public transport authorities and transport companies have been confronted with a multitude of questions and possible answers.

lire plus
Car-free city: meaningful reform or wishful thinking?

Car-free city: meaningful reform or wishful thinking?

Looking at our society from a above perspective without any prior knowledge, it seems as if the idea of a planet with endless resources has strongly manifested itself in the minds of people. A prime example of this way of thinking is the current use of motorised individual transport. If I want to drive, I have a seat in my car, fill up the tank, fasten my seat belt, press the accelerator and drive off. This way of thinking is dangerous. Motorised individual transport requires that resources are consumed – for a car that weighs 1.5 tonnes on average, that means about 70 tonnes of material only in production. In addition, the car pollutes the environment with every use and takes up too much space, especially in large cities.

lire plus
Perspectives from Prof. Peter Eckart

Perspectives from Prof. Peter Eckart

Prof. Peter Eckart studied product design at the Bergische Universität GHS Wuppertal and later at the Hochschule für bildende Künste Hamburg. In 2000, he founded the design studio unit-design, Frankfurt, Bern, together with Bernd Hilpert, with whom he also works for the Deutsche Bahn. Since 2000 Peter Eckart has been Professor of Integrative Design at the HfG Offenbach and since 2011 Vice President of the University. His central research field is mobility design. Since 2018, he has been leading the interdisciplinary LOEWE research project with Prof. Dr. Kai Vöckler in the fields of urban and transport planning, social science mobility research, multimedia technologies and the design entitled project-mo.de, which focuses on the role of design in changing mobility behaviour.

lire plus
The Vienna Model

The Vienna Model

Vienna’s public transport system is among the best in the world. The network is dense and the frequency is tight. It is so well developed that you don’t even need to know the timetable. A total of 2.61 million people are transported from A to B by public transport here every day. The popularity can also be seen in the modal split, because: The public transport users have overtaken the car drivers. Around 38 percent of the distances are covered by public transport, while « only » 27 percent are covered by car. But what makes vienna different from other cities?

lire plus
Perspectives from Jakob Muus

Perspectives from Jakob Muus

Jakob Muus is the founder and CEO of Tracks, a Berlin-based tech company with the goal of making road freight transport more efficient and sustainable through modern technologies. The platform developed by Tracks provides its users with analyses and recommendations for action, with which they can reduce the fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of their fleet. This not only improves the environmental balance but also the competitiveness of participating companies.

lire plus
Mobility in the city

Mobility in the city

An ever increasing urbanization of our society is clearly visible. Young people in particular are increasingly moving their centre of life from rural regions to the cities. In addition, there are many commuters who do not want to live directly in the urban jungle, but who find well-paid jobs mainly in the cities. This congestion in the cities and the associated additional traffic flows have consequences – especially for our increasingly grey planet. But what challenges must urban public transport face in times of the mobility change? And what role will it itself play in this?

lire plus