What is … a Mobility Hub?

What is … a Mobility Hub?

Mobility Hubs, also known as Mobility stations, are publicly accessible locations where various modes of transport and sharing services converge. These can be S-Bahn (suburban train) and subway stations in an urban context, or even a bus stop in the countryside where rental bikes are available or important bus routes intersect. At these stations, people can easily switch from one mode of transport to another. Mobility hubs promote efficient and sustainable mobility by offering various mobility services, otherwise known as Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS). The concept can be expanded from a simple bus stop to large Mobility Hubs, for example, with a combination of on-demand transport, car sharing stations, or e-scooters.

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What is … demand-responsive transport (DRT)?

What is … demand-responsive transport (DRT)?

Demand-responsive Transport (DRT) refers to a technology-based and shared mobility service. Instead of following predefined routes, timetables and fixed stops, on-demand services follow no timetable, also make virtual stops and operate on different routes. The vehicles operate on demand and when needed. Booking is usually done via app but can also be done via phone call and/or in the web browser. DRT combines the reliability of conventional public transport with the flexible availability of private cars.

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What is … level 1-5 of autonomous driving?  

What is … level 1-5 of autonomous driving?  

Autonomous driving has been considered one of the major trends in the mobility industry for years. According to a representative survey conducted by the digital association Bitkom in 2021, 99.8 percent of respondents can imagine using an autonomous means of transport*. But what does it actually mean when car manufacturers send the first systems for highly automated driving on the road at level 3 and level 4 autonomous shuttles reinforce public transport in Germany on demand from 2023 onwards?    

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What is… a local public transport plan?   

What is… a local public transport plan?   

A local public transport plan is a planning instrument in which all performance and quality criteria for the operation of local public transport in an area are acquired. The local transport plan analyses the existing mobility offer and serves as a guideline for the future development of local mobility. 

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What is … the difference between AST and ALT?

What is … the difference between AST and ALT?

The abbreviation AST in German means “Anruf-Sammel-Taxi”, in English “call-collective-taxi” and ALT means “Anruf-Linien-Taxi” – call-line-taxi. Both are demand-oriented special forms of public transport in urban, local or even regional traffic. With a small number of passengers, a large bus in regular service is uneconomical. That’s why there are the AST and ALT services – they are only in operation there is need and demand – “on-demand” in a manner of speaking.

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What is… Employability?

What is… Employability?

In today’s working environment, employers increasingly face the challenge of recruiting and retaining good employees. And one of the keywords in this context is employability.

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Senior-friendly public transport: What should age-appropriate public transport look like?

Senior-friendly public transport: What should age-appropriate public transport look like?

Europe’s population is ageing. in 2019, more than a fifth (20.3 per cent) of the EU-27 population was at least 65 years old. And the trend is still rising. Demographic change is a challenge for public transport, but it can also be an opportunity for growth with a customised mobility offer for senior citizens. After all, if older people no longer drive, they are increasingly dependent on public transport in order to continue to actively participate in social life.